#CommsChat on PR beyond reputation management

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat we’re joined by Amanda Coleman, head of corporate communication at Greater Manchester Police, for a #CommsChat on why PR is more than just reputation management. We’ll look at how reputation management is defined, how it fits into everyday PR roles and why industry bodies can play a role in redefining PR. Follow @CommsChat on Twitter and use the hashtag #CommsChat to get involved.

The topics are:

    • How do you define reputation management
    • Is reputation management your sole role?
    • Are ethics and reputation management in conflict?
    • Do the industry bodies need to redefine PR particularly around focus on reputation management?
    • If not reputation management then what else?
    • What should the role of the communicator be in all this to support the business?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place every Monday, from 8-9pm GMT. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will be posted to Storify on Tuesday morning. We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics – please get in touch with Amy at amy.sandys@communicatemagazine.co.uk or contact us on Twitter with any ideas.

 

Why internal comms has a role to play in building positive employee experience

This week's chat

Rubain Manzoor

Millennials have begun to take over the workforce. Organisations need to know how to stimulate, engage, and retain this extremely sophisticated class of employees, says Rubain Manzoor, content marketing manager at Contact Monkey.

Organisations have been slow to learn but are finally catching up on the importance of investing time and resources into creating strong employee experiences – and there’s a good reason why.

A study by Future Workplace found that 83% of HR leaders claim strong employee experiences lead to improved organisational productivity and success. In response, they are pushing for new types of engagement, and companies must respond to their demands by developing robust employee experiences.

But how does internal comms fit into all of this? And, more importantly, what role do communicators play in creating successful employee experiences?

In the past, organisations have devoted a lot of time and resources into creating successful customer experiences, allocating massive budgets to external relations and communications, while overlooking the need for internal marketing and communications.

With the rise of employee experiences, the focus has shifted on engaging the workforce, giving internal communicators the responsibility to create communication strategies that reflect cohesiveness and engagement among employees.

It’s not so much that Millennials and Gen Z want different things from their jobs; they want the same things as previous generations and more. They still need to have clear goals and a route for achieving them, but they want to know what value those goals are contributing. They want to feel part of a team, listened to and valued, but this need is amplified because they have grown up with a constant flow of messages, comments and likes on social media.

A big flaw in large organisations is the trickling of information in a top-down flow. Information often gets lost, distorted, or mismanaged, often leaving managers confused and in a tough spot.

Internal communicators can help by providing middle management with better, easier-to-use tools and processes that decrease the chances of information getting forgotten or delayed. And when it comes to delivering messages that apply to the whole organisation (or an entire location), have a central way of delivering them to reduce the pressure on individual team managers.

When it comes to internal comms, employees appreciate a steady flow of information which tells them how their team and the wider company is progressing towards various goals. But within this, they want to know that their own job matters. A recent LinkedIn survey found that 73% of the 26,000 people surveyed globally wanted a career where they felt they were making a difference.

Companies need to wake up to the fact that internal communications can no longer be treated as an afterthought; it’s an important business function that, when done well, helps keep employees engaged and loyal to the organisation. When neglected, it’s likely to have the opposite effect.

To keep a Millennial workforce engaged, an effective internal communications system should provide motivation for employees to keep working towards a shared goal. By seeing what they are working towards, employees are likely to become more committed to doing their part.

Fortunately, it seems that a growing number of companies are actively investing in the idea of letting internal comms own employee engagement programs in the modern workplace. A 2016 internal communication survey revealed that internal comms budgets are on the rise, with 87% of respondents saying their budget would either stay the same or increase in the coming years.

The ultimate goal of internal communication is to help leaders get their message out. In order to get buy-in, make decision-makers aware of this goal and get them involved in the planning and development phase of your internal comms strategy.

Rubain Manzoor is content marketing manager at internal communications Outlook tool Contact Monkey. Contact Monkey is holding a #CommsChat on 14 May – keep an eye on the website for details of topics

What do you think? Continue the #CommsChat on Twitter

Want to contribute? Email amy.sandys@communicatemagazine.co.uk

 

 

#CommsChat on ethical campaigning

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat we’re joined by Simon Francis, founder of social enterprise Campaign Collective and chair of the PRCA’s charity and NFP group, to talk about ethical campaigning. We’ll look at what must be considered before beginning a campaign, the ethics of partnerships between charities and corporations, and the importance of safeguarding. Follow @CommsChat on Twitter and use the hashtag #CommsChat to get involved.

The topics are:

  • What ethical considerations do you consider when developing a campaign?
  • Do joint campaigns get results? When organisations collaborate, how can ethical standards be upheld?
  • Charity/corporate partnerships – who’s in charge?
  • How do we safeguard using real life stories in campaigns?
  • Do you have an ethical statement in your organisation – or your own head?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place every Monday, from 8-9pm GMT. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will be posted to Storify on Tuesday morning. We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics – please get in touch with Amy at amy.sandys@communicatemagazine.co.uk or contact us on Twitter with any ideas.

 

#CommsChat on employer value proposition

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat we’re looking at employer value proposition (EVP) and how its best communicated to attract, recruit and retain talent. We’ll look at the differences between employer branding and EVP, how to develop a unique EVP for your organisation that’s true to your culture, and what EVP means to you. Follow @CommsChat on Twitter and use the hashtag #CommsChat to get involved.

The topics are:

  • What does employer value proposition (EVP) mean to you/your organisation?
  • How do you develop an inspiring EVP which is unique to your organisation and its culture?
  • What’s the best way to communicate an EVP to attract talent?
  • Who is responsible for developing an organisation’s EVP?
  • What’s the difference between EVP and employer brand?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place every Monday, from 8-9pm GMT. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will be posted to Storify on Tuesday morning. We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics – please get in touch with Amy at amy.sandys@communicatemagazine.co.uk or contact us on Twitter with any ideas.

 

Transcript of #CommsChat on internal comms and reputation

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat we were joined by founder of Repute Associates, Ed Coke, to talk about the relationship between internal comms and reputation. We looked at what internal comms can do to mitigate reputation crises, the degree of recognition afforded to internal communicators and companies that are fostering engaging employee cultures.

 

#CommsChat on IC and reputation

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat we’re joined by Ed Coke, founder of Repute Associates, for a #CommsChat on reputation ahead of the Institute of Internal Communication’s (IoIC) annual conference. Taking place in Birmingham in May, this year’s conference theme is ‘Transforming Reputation: From the inside out.’ On Monday, we’ll look at the importance of IC in shaping corporate reputation, how communicators can respond to reputation crises and if/how the impact of reputation should be measured. Follow @CommsChat on Twitter and use the hashtag #CommsChat to get involved.

The topics are:

  • How important is internal comms in shaping corporate reputation?
  • Do internal communicators get enough recognition in managing corporate reputation?
  • How can internal communicators better respond to reputation crises?
  • What new skills do internal communicators need to better support reputation management?
  • How should the impact of internal communications on reputation be measured?
  • Where and when has internal comms best help strengthen corporate reputation?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place every Monday, from 8-9pm GMT. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will be posted to Storify on Tuesday morning. We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics – please get in touch with Amy at amy.sandys@communicatemagazine.co.uk or contact us on Twitter with any ideas.