CommsChat on video and internal comms

This week's chat

This week on #CommsChat, we’ll take a look at the uses of video for reaching an internal audience. There are many interesting uses of video for IC – often used by companies trying to explain a complex topic or reach a widespread audience. We’ll be joined by IVCA CEO Marco Forgione (@MarcoIVCA) and another guest or two.

Topics:

  • Why is video a useful tool for reaching a geographically disparate audience?
  • How can video be used to inform an internal audience about complex ideas?
  • What can video do that other IC tools can’t?
  • What should communicators do to make videos engaging and watchable?
  • What developments will shape the industry over the next few years?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place from 8-9pm UK time – for worldwide times, go here. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will go up on Tuesday morning.

We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics for #CommsChat – get in touch with Brittany by email or Twitter if you’ve got ideas.

 

Transcript of #CommsChat with Waggener Edstrom

This week's chat

Last week, we were joined by the GM of Waggener Edstrom UK, Cairbre Sugrue. He shared his insights on content marketing, public relations and social media. Here are some tweets that stood out:

@krismikulka4 I agree, I think it’s no longer ok to only push out messaging – customers want to be involved and to collaborate.
@thebeaverhousen Brands find success when they understand the middle ground between what the customer wants to know & what the brand wants to say
@cairbreUK the key is credibility. Customers are being bombarded with content today, which studies show they don’t trust
@thebeaverhousen PR hasn’t really changed we’re still conveying a message/story/narrative. Its just the carrier of that message which is different
@cairbreUK agree behave in business communications more as you would talking to close family, be more authentic
And the full hour:

 

  1. Tonight’s must draw to a close. Join me in thanking for his expertise and insights tonight.

  2. I am not sure it has. There has always be a crossover between marketing and PR. Content used for different purposes

  3. The ability to copywrite for diff audiences, across different channels&intricacies diff markets key skills for PRs in modern age

  4. agree behave in business communications more as you would talking to close family, be more authentic

  5. . writting skills still important, you have to be able to craft stories for many channels – trad. press, social,

  6. I agree, especially in the digital age, where so many employees may need info on digital activities.

  7. You also have to be able to start and engage in a conversation rather than just ‘pushing’ messages out.

  8. Last few min of . Who has questions for GM ?

  9. writing possible, but you have to be able to craft stories for many channels – trad. press, social, video

  10. usually has something to say RT : How has the focus on content shifted skills requirements in PR?

  11. PR hasn’t really changed we’re still conveying a message/story/narrative. Its just the carrier of that message which is different

  12. more importantly PRs have to talk the language of marketers understand how their work meets biz goals

  13. you must understand the different channels available, the right analytical tools to evaluate success

  14. I think it’s put a stronger emphasis on writing skills, but then, that can’t be a bad thing for communicators!

  15. Last topic of the night is about content marketers: How has the focus on content shifted skills requirements in PR?

  16. As agreed on importance of research/analytics it is time for topic 4: What skills do you need for ?

  17. I agree but picking the right analytics is key – you need to start with digging under the audience’s skin

  18. sure guilty of buzzword bingo! Digital means you can access info at lower cost, faster

  19. of course but that isn’t analytics but a lot of research via multiple avenues

  20. of course but that isn’t analytics that’s a lot of research over multiple avenues

  21. RT : know what you customers are saying, where & when before you create content

  22. Or, what skills are required to be an effective content marketer?

  23. Topic 4 takes a bit of a shift: What are the top skills required for a PR person?

  24. Don’t miss a chance to ask your own question on ! Tweet your question now using

  25. true changing slowly as practitioners we need to get better at explaining value

  26. True. I have found that starting with a few key analytics (strategy) and build up

  27. know your audience, tell good stories and be authentic all part of a good recipe

  28. yes & we’ve done a lot of analytics training lately but it’s a bit chicken & egg

  29. True, but that goes together usually. You need the analytics to be good at content.

  30. analytics & segmentation have to inform content of course

  31. . How can you get accurate measurements? Ensure that they’re accurate?

  32. True but analytics is really opening eyes among marketers, helps to show value

  33. Whatever we do, storytelling must be a crucial part of it says in

  34. Without analytics content marketing would be like winking in the dark – you know you’re doing it but not sure if anyone can see u

  35. Time for topic 3: Does content marketing produce results?

  36. sure but its not just the content, technical side is critical important too analytics etc

  37. I do think with content marketing that search and discovery is still important

  38. isn’t that just the principles of good storytelling should be part of any marketing 🙂

  39. they don’t trust content that is all about the brand. Listen & give resources not just promotion

  40. done properly should be at the very foundation of the narrative

  41. agree, would argue can’t be done in isolation. Good content adheres to the basic principles of storytelling

  42. agree– such a great opportunity to better understand your customers

  43. Content marketing should be a part of a larger strategy. However, its basics are key: rich stories, engagement, audience centric

  44. Agree – which is why insight is so important – and profiling your customers. Segmentation has exploded thanks to social

  45. the key is credibility. Customers are being bombarded with content today, which studies show they don’t trust

  46. Content Marketing these days needs to be put in front of audience. Ordinary marketing still tends to be found instead

  47. Couldn’t agree more. Stats show most customers use at least 3 channels to communicate with 1 brand.

  48. A2 Marketing traditionally has put the org/product first; has to put the audience first

  49. I’d say we have to be careful to avoid the hype, good is an extension of your core strategy

  50. Employees & brand advocates (peers) are seen as the 2 most credible sources. How employees act is vital.

  51. Yes definitely. Multi-channel approach is essential now in everyday comms both internal & external.

  52. Brands find success when they understand the middle ground between what the customer wants to know & what the brand wants to say

  53. which is why social has become very important. In order to help shape it the way you want, must participate

  54. This is happening now. Join in at RT : On to topic 2: : How’s it different from marketing?

  55. Absolutely! Customer insight is invaluable in getting the correct message, medium & audience.

  56. RT : yes they did brands are nervous now is because customers can shape a narrative that doesn’t fit with the brand

  57. On to topic 2: Content marketing: How’s it different from marketing?

  58. . True! I can think of a few examples, not least of which is the HMV/Twitter ordeal

  59. agreed. As our networks widen overall, that has impacted processes greatly. It’s not just cust, but employees as well.

  60. Don’t forget the tag! Others won’t see your tweets if you only reply to the acct.

  61. Students and grads, if you’re interested in a career in PR follow the hashtag for industry discussions, every Mon 8 – 9pm i.e NOW

  62. RT : brands have to take time to understand their audiences first and foremost

  63. . that may be true It’s amazing the impact a single customer can have on brand reputation just via social/trad media

  64. I think a brand still has a lot of control over it’s messaging, how they portray themselves. BUT customers have wider influence

  65. RT : but brands can’t deliver their messages the old command control manner

  66. Hi , please use the tag when tweeting!

  67. RT : true but I think they also have to be prepared to allow customers to shape the narrative to a certain extent

  68. or should I say the narrative is 50% of the brand?

  69. RT : Cust. are helping create narrative, it’s down to brands to steer that & create added value w/ engaging content

  70. A1 Social Media has made it easy for fans/customers to create community & conversations around anything, including your brand

  71. I agree, I think it’s no longer ok to only push out messaging – customers want to be involved and to collaborate.

  72. . What should they be doing to prepare themselves

  73. brands need not necessarily lose control, but they have to be prepared to be involved in more dynamic conversations

  74. Or are companies losing control of narrative at all?

  75. Maybe taking on additional brands to portfolio and losing track of core values along the way. thoughts?

  76. Social has a role to play, obv, but there’s an argument to be made 4 companies themselves getting bigger than msging can handle?

  77. First topic of with is: Why are brands no longer in control of their narrative?

  78. That should read “Why are brands…” my fault!

  79. Our first topic tonight is: Why brands are no longer in control of their narrative?

  80. Please don’t forget to use the tag when tweeting!

  81. : looks at all aspects relating to communications, When: Mondays, 8:00pm UK.

  82. Tonight we’ll take a look at content marketing, skills and PR with from

  83. Am battling a slow connection, but will be with you throughout the hour

  84. Evening friends, Brittany here from Communicate. Tonight on , we’re joined by from

 

#CommsChat on content with Waggener Edstrom

This week's chat

This week, we’ll be joined by GM of Waggener Edstrom UK, Cairbre Sugrue (@WE_UK), who will chat about narrative, content and skills in PR. Take a look at the topics below.

  • Why brands are no longer in control of their narrative?
  • Content marketing: How’s it different from marketing?
  • Does content marketing produce results?
  • What are the top skills required for a PR person?
  • How has the focus on content shifted these skills requirements?

Join us! We tweet from @CommsChat and #CommsChat takes place from 8-9pm UK time – for worldwide times, go here. Anyone can take part in the discussion – simply follow the hashtag here or on Twitter. If you can’t make the chat or would like to revisit it, a transcript will go up on Tuesday morning.

We’d love to hear your suggestions for future topics for #CommsChat – get in touch with Brittany by email or Twitter if you’ve got ideas.

 

Transcript of #CommsChat on #brandvandals

This week's chat

Last week, we featured the authors of the first book to have a hashtag as a title – Steve Earl and Stephen Waddington. The dynamic duo chatted about brand vandalism, crisis management and the abyss of complaints on social media.

Some interesting tweets:

  •  @AllthingsIC A2) Great phrase – ‘caustic criticism’ – key is for brands to be aware of the conversations, both on and offline
  • @mynameisearl T2: Actually moaning can be healthy: gets it off chest/useful feedback. V British #commschat. Normally don’t see #brandvandals coming though
  • @totmac Don’t dismiss people who are passionate because they care about the orgs. brand values and want to see them honoured
  • @NafisaNathani If customers care enough complain social media, will care enough to have conversation allow brands to convert ranters to ravers
  • @wadds A4. I also think we’re impatient. Societal change takes generations, not days or weeks.
  • @wadds Point of #brandvandals is that they’ve always existed. Nothing changes apart from speed and need for PRs to step up

Read the full transcript:

 

 

  1. This is Brittany signing off. G’night all!

  2. Thanks Steve and Stephen for a great . You can pick up a copy of on Amazon. See transcript of the past hour tmrw AM

  3. Simple. PRs need to step up. We’ve never been more relevant. But if don’t we face becoming irrelevant

  4. It has been lovely (ing) with you all, now off to an audience with some stakeholders, publicly 🙂

  5. But it will fade/be forgotten if your experience isn’t matched in store!

  6. A6) I’ve extracted relevant info for IC pros. Yes you still need to read it

  7. . We haven’t quite finished it yet but so far we like it! A great follow up to , well done guys!

  8. Can’t ever see McKinsey suggesting that a client needs to “grow a pair”. Wonder if they have a model for that?

  9. RT : Final thoughts from authors and ? <It’s real. It’s tough. Crack on. Fear no-one.

  10. RT but the speed is unprecedented, which makes it all the more challenging (and exciting)!

  11. Sorry if I missed it, but are malicious in their intent, or simply frustrated and disconnected from brand?

  12. I’ve been doing that all night. Along with T6. That’ll be the next Heathrow terminal.

  13. but the speed is unprecedented, which makes it all the more challenging (and exciting)!

  14. engage with other depts, legal, ops, cust services, make allies internally. the will need it when crisis hits

  15. also available in speech format, a consulting model and there’s documentary in the works

  16. it changed mine… I didn’t know either had attitude. All hail Tesco

  17. Sorry I meant A6. To Q6. Not the type of Audi.

  18. RT Point of is that they’ve always existed. Nothing changes apart from speed and need for PRs to step up

  19. would be interesting to find out! Perhaps Twitter isn’t as powerful as some of us think!

  20. Point of is that they’ve always existed. Nothing changes apart from speed and need for PRs to step up

  21. Only way is engage, engage and engage- treat them like VIPs – it shows to everyone you care about customers in a personal way

  22. A6) I believe there’s a 90 day plan in a certain book….

  23. A5 Be prepared. Review systems and processes. Inject agility. Apply commonsense. Grow a pair

  24. RT with tact, diplomacy, time and honesty

  25. : T5. Listen and then figure out whether to take action. Basic PR best practice. “Agreed.Good PR starts there.

  26. A6) Orgs should deal with by knowing they exist in 1st place (listening), then determine how to respond. Same rules

  27. RT : Last one: How should organisations deal with ? <Buy book/read/act? 😉

  28. I thought it worth capturing via Storify when it happened as had a feeling it may vanish

  29. T5. Listen and then figure out whether to take action. Basic PR best practice.

  30. there’s been a lot written then & since on whether it’s appropriate banter/language. Cust perception? I’m not sure

  31. RT : 1.1 million tweets/day with consumer wine views. listens & turn data into insight for industry <vin-tastic

  32. I didn’t know that another user initiated the whole thing! Brilliant fun

  33. Last one: How should organisations deal with ?

  34. I could see the wicked smile on your lips as you typed that ‘free’ comment and sat back… 😉

  35. very amusing but did it change customer perceptions of these brands?

  36. A5 – One advantage of is the short, sharp shock can prompt a brand rethink and action. Can be avoided though

  37. in a column I did in August, I indicated surprise how activist websites now sometimes being used against co’s.

  38. but even nutters need to be taken seriously – they still have power to disrupt.

  39. 1.1 million tweets per day with consumer views of wine. listens & turn data into insight for wine industry

  40. agree re: expectations. More info and knowledge is a powerful influencer. A4.

  41. +1 RT robust with flexibility is probably the key to handling a crisis successfully

  42. And apart from your time, it’s largely free

  43. A5 Let’s kickoff with an old fashioned bit of listening. Twitter is the largest research group you didn’t commision

  44. XO RT Think it’s worth saying a lot of these ‘brand vandals’ aren’t to be taken THAT seriously–most just nutters

  45. RT : Greenpeace, PETA, nutters? Don’t think so. <Can learn lots from them actually

  46. one way is to be be seen as addressing any issues and engaging with stakeholders (or whatever they are)

  47. robust with flexibility is probably the key to handling a crisis succesfully

  48. Always amazes me I even have the time to be grumpy about lots of things

  49. . don’t forget ! Who can forget their fantastical rap battle…

  50. Greenpeace, PETA, nutters? Don’t think so.

  51. I think increased competition has deepened our expectations for things that are harder to deliver consistently.

  52. RT : A5) “Lack of robust processes in an organisation can endanger it” <Yes. Often overlooked in comms

  53. agree but was disillusion created by faster society or has digital just given more options to act and fight back.

  54. true, social has increased expectations some meet them others slow and fail

  55. RT : T5: How can ire of brand vandals be turned to a brand’s advantage? <Question doesn’t include ‘stakeholder’. Phew!

  56. Think it’s worth saying that a lot of these ‘brand vandals’ aren’t to be taken THAT seriously – most are just nutters

  57. A5) According to a book I read recently (ahem), “Lack of robust processes in an organisation can endanger it”

  58. interesting POV. Do we expect too much?

  59. Equally, many brands/firms still don’t feel ‘answerable’ to regular media

  60. RT I suggest disillusionment isn’t higher, but expectations are. New channels are much more public, too. A4

  61. I suggest disillusionment isn’t higher, but expectations are. New channels are much more public, too. A4

  62. T5: How can the ire of brand vandals be turned to a brand’s advantage?

  63. A4. the mirror of opinion towards brands and business is bigger than it has been before. And maps real time.

  64. Look at as a great example of how the brand is dealing with negativity with humour and sarcasm

  65. Hi Amanda, agreed > RT As well as negativity ppl can say when they are pleased to have issue resolved, and they do

  66. Stakeholders fine with me, reflects world we operate in, particularly in IC. Agreed, their understanding =crucial

  67. Measurable levels higher because it’s simply more visible?

  68. And they do. Critics easily converted to loyal advocates.

  69. or just too much, too fast with often senior stakeholders (oops) not understanding the channel

  70. A4. are levels of disillusionment higher? or is it that people have more ways to express and share what they have always felt.

  71. As well as negativity people can say when they are pleased to have an issue resolved, and they do

  72. A4. I also think we’re impatient. Societal change takes generations, not days or weeks.

  73. A4 All starts within the business. Has to be ‘good’ inside. Can’t expect a slap of make-up to conceal pock-marks

  74. Absolutely! Like during the blackout… an overused example maybe but they made us laugh

  75. A4. Online action rarely translates to real life tangible action. I’m looking for examples

  76. RT : T4: Consumers have opportunity to voice opinion yet disillusionment higher than ever. What’s broken? <The walls?

  77. Disillusionment has always been high- it can just be tracked now. Brands can’t hide from being held to account in every way poss

  78. Q4. A Like, +1, fav is easy. Its mouse click. Real action is hard

  79. A4) Hmm, good question. People always had option to have their say, no permission needed. Disillusionment = more visible?

  80. Q4. This is an interesting issue. Very easy to mobilize a gang online… difficult to mobilize real change.

  81. On complaints: some brands seem to play precious around minor moans in the scheme of things. Sense of perspective & humour go far

  82. yes people complain by social media have been let down by traditional avenues-empathy needed

  83. to be honest… I tailor tags more specifically. Stakeholders generic and assuming

  84. I’m guessing uses something like “my dudes.” 😉

  85. T4: Consumers have the opportunity to voice opinion yet levels of disillusionment are higher than ever. What’s broken?

  86. meh. dissing my use of “stakeholders.” Apparently i’m not “hip” enough a PR practitioner for her.

  87. so what can brands learn from ? Should they try to win them over?

  88. Previous tweet is quote from – it’s level of dialogue that is growing. Positive & negative views always existed

  89. The platforms/channels may have changed , but principles of good communication (and PR) remain constant. Or classic.

  90. anyone with a significant public/network of their own can be an influencer. Bloggers or Twitter/Instagram users

  91. Contrary to rumour and I did not provoke & to brandvandalise each other here over semantics 😉

  92. The cheek! Like keeping things “classic”? This discussion is brought to you by Twitter.

  93. journos are influencers, intermediaries to a public/market

  94. A3) “Engagement isn’t option –it’s necessity. forcing level of dialogue orgs never had to contemplate before”

  95. A3. I’m rather cynical about online complainers. Find most are of the lazy variety with a self-inflated sense of importance.

  96. No one’s mentioned journalists?

  97. Good point! Critics often show they care about an org by taking time to criticize it.

  98. well you go with whatever hipster term you want but referring to stakeholders and publics is Classic public relations.

  99. anyone and everyone. Much easier for people to group around a common cause now. That’s why engagement is v important

  100. RT : If customers care enough to complain, will allow brands to convert ranters to ravers <Yes. Minus glowsticks

  101. yes, we argue that they are the people most likely to become advocates

  102. Well, that would depend as I’m sure it varies from organisation to organisation – customers, councillors, staff etc.

  103. I was being quite serious (ish). I take care with my labels and “stakeholder” is far too dusty and rigid for me .

  104. Agreed > RT A3 Anyone with an interest, good and bad

  105. Interesting RT Don’t dismiss people who are passionate b/c they care about orgs. brand values & want to see them honoured

  106. everyone! We are in an era absolute transparency. Customers, employees, shareholders – we are living world activism

  107. A3) Huge list & growing! Employees, customers, future & ex emp, politicians etc. Various methods bt all passionate & relevant POV